Overblog
Seguir este blog Administration + Create my blog

present progressive

THE PASSIVE VOICE

Publicado en por D

THE PASSIVE VOICE

THE PASSIVE VOICE

This is one of the most difficult topics in English language. There are many ways to say one same thing, so, some people apply it in order to avoid the repetition or to seem very polite. Today I am going to explain it to you use it as well, HERE WE GO!!!

Before starting I have to leave clear that ACTIVE VOICE is the normal way to use the language, I mean, the use of SUBJECT+VERB+OBJECT, (remember that every tense has its own variation). So in PASSIVE VOICE the original OBJECT will be the SUBJECT of the sentence, in other words it would be something like this OBJECT+BE+VERB PP+SUBJECT.  It is easy and you will understand it.

The first thing you have to know is that the verb to be is so necessary; you are going to need it. You can make passive voice sentences in any tense conjugating that verb in the time you want to speak.

Another thing you must know about this topic is that the main verb must go in its past participle conjugation, if you want to know more about conjugations click here.

And the most important thing about this is… the object of the sentences will be the subject. If you don’t get it, don’t worry, we will see some examples in order to understand it. The original subject in the Active Voice is not necessary in the Passive Voice sentence, if you want to put it, it’s up to you. In my opinion, I prefer to put it because it gives more information and it is clearer.

And finishing, when you turn an ACTIVE VOICE sentence into a PASSIVE VOICE one, you have to think that the normal conjugation rules also apply to the new SUBJECT. Let’s see the examples to get it.

 

Here a little chart where you can see all the possible conjugations of it.

Simple present

Is/Are/Am + Verb PP

Simple past

Was/Were + Verb PP

Present progressive

Is/Are/Am + Being + Verb PP

Past  Progressive

Was/Were + Being + Verb PP

Present Perfect simple

Have/ Has + Been + Verb PP

Past Perfect simple

Had + Been + Verb PP

Present Perfect Continuous

Have/ Has+ Been + Being + Verb PP

 

Let’s see some examples.

  1. Active Voice:  “Sammy Plays tennis. As you can see that sentence is in Simple Present, so the passive voice must go in Simple present as well but this time using the verb to be and the verb in PP (Past Participle), something like this “The tennis is played by Sammy (or ´her´ if you don’t want to write the name again)”

 

  1. Active: The soldiers are running in the field (sentence in Present Progressive “ing”)

PASSIVE: The field is being run by the soldiers (They)

 

  1. ACTIVE: I have ridden the same motorcycle (Sentence in Present Perfect “have”)

PASSIVE: The same motorcycle has been ridden by me

 

 

THE PASSIVE VOICE

Ver comentarios

The Tenses

Publicado en por D

Info resource: English Grammar Intermediate Therory&Practice by Nicholas Agnon, Terry Vigo 2014

Info resource: English Grammar Intermediate Therory&Practice by Nicholas Agnon, Terry Vigo 2014

The Tenses

 

The tenses allow us to move through time and express our ideas, actions, desires and wishes whenever we want. We should keep in mind that time is divided into three main time groups: the past, present and future.

Each group has 4 tenses in the English grammar: simple, continuous, perfect simple, perfect continuous.

PAST

PRESENT

FUTURE

Past simple

Present  simple

Future simple

Past continuous

Present continuous

Future continuous

Past perfect simple

Present perfect simple

Future perfect simple

Past perfect continuous

Present perfect continuous

Future perfect continuous

 

That is 12 tenses in total. Let’s see how tenses are easily divided and understood. In order to comprehend them better we are going to divide the four tenses of each group into 2 similar groups. We will name Simple Tenses all the simples and continuous ones and Perfect Tenses the perfect simple and the present continuous.

The Simple Tenses

Tenses always talk about a moment in time. Our first group the simple tenses talk about one moment in time. Therefore the simple present and continuous talk about one moment in present, the past simple and continuous about one moment in the past and the future simple and continuous about one moment in the future. They do not connect different time groups but remain within their own time group.

All these tenses use key or signal words in sentences to show us the moment in time that they talk about. Remember that signal words are one of the main indicators of time in a sentence other than meaning so it is very important to look for these signals words in sentences before making your final decision about tense.

The perfect tenses

In contrast to the simple tenses, this group connects two moments in time. Perfect means completed therefore one moment included in all perfect tenses is the past. Depending on the tense we can find the second moment in time connected to the past. In this way the present perfect tenses connect a moment in the past with a moment in the present, the past perfect tenses connect two moments in the past, and the future perfect tenses connect a moment in the past with a moment in the future.

We must keep in mind that perfect means the verb: HAVE, so in present perfect tenses the verb uses its present form (have), in the past perfect tenses it uses its past form (had) and in the future perfect tenses it uses its future form (will have). We add the past participle form of the main verb to complete the perfect simple tenses. The continuous tenses have to follow the rule of all the continuous tenses (be + ing) and the rule of all the perfect tenses (have/had/will have). In order to form the perfect continuous tenses we combine the verb have + been + main verb ing.

 

 

 

Ver comentarios

Present Progressive (continuous) (Eng)

Publicado en por D

Image source:  http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/present_progressive_diagram.htm

Image source: http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/present_progressive_diagram.htm

Hello, today I bring this useful information about one grammatical tense very used in English, I hope you like it.

The present progressive is used for mentioning the actions that are ocurring in the right moment they are said. It works with the same auxiliar verbs of the verb to Be (is- are- am). Its particularity is the use of the gerund (ING). it is easy to remember and to use, there are certain exceptions, but those are easy to remember as well.

 

          IS                            ARE                             AM

He               It              You           We                     I

         She                            They

 

 

Structures:

(+)  Pron +  Aux verb  +  Verb (ing)  +  compl

(-)  Pron  +  Aux verb  +  not  +  Verb (ing)  +  Compl

(?)  Aux verb  +  Pron  +  Verb (ing)  +  Compl  ?

 

Ex:

She is reading a book

She is not (isn't) reading a book

Is she reading  book?

 

* The negation could be contracted in this way (isn't - Aren't) but the recoomendation is to put them separately, because it is more formal.

Exceptions

* When a verb has only one syllable and a vowel is after a consonant and before a last consonant, the last consonant is doubled (Run = Running; Dig = Digging; Swim= Swimming)

Ver comentarios